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Medicaid

Budget focus: Medicaid growth, hep C drugs, SHBP

The state’s Department of Community Health is asking for additional state funds to cover projected Georgia enrollment for Medicaid and PeachCare, which for the first time will exceed 2 million.

Clyde Reese

Clyde Reese

The budget proposal also requests $23 million to cover the high cost of drugs to treat hepatitis C patients in both the midyear fiscal 2016 budget and in the 2017 plan.

The budget plans, approved by Community Health’s board Thursday, now go to Gov. Nathan Deal and then to the Georgia General Assembly for approval.

It would be the second straight year that the agency will not have to cut its base budget, said Community Health Commissioner Clyde Reese. The agency’s current budget is roughly $3 billion in state funds.

Hepatitis C drugs have an astronomical cost, averaging more than $30,000 per patient per month in retail price. But states, including Georgia, can get a discount on that price for their Medicaid programs that could reach 40 percent. full story

State outlines arguments against Medicaid ‘waiver’

The state’s Medicaid agency has all but ruled out Grady Health System’s “waiver’’ proposal to cover more uninsured Georgians.

Photo of the Georgia Capitol Building“We’re not going to move forward on this at this time,’’ Clyde Reese, commissioner of the Department of Community Health, said at an agency board meeting Thursday.

He cited “significant costs to the state” to implement the proposal.

Reese added that federal officials indicated they would consider the waiver proposal only if Georgia was willing also to expand its Medicaid program. That is something Georgia political leaders have emphatically declined to do.   full story

State agency: Medicaid ‘waiver’ plan too expensive

Grady Health System’s proposal to cover more uninsured through a “waiver’’ has run into a major snag at the state’s Medicaid agency.

The big problem is concern about the cost.

Photo of the Georgia Capitol BuildingThe current waiver proposal “is cost-prohibitive to the state,’’ Jeremy Arieh, a spokesman for the Georgia Department of Community Health, told GHN on Tuesday.

The Grady plan contains several factors “that present a challenge and a significant cost to the state,’’ he added.

DCH and Grady officials met recently to discuss the waiver proposal, which would use federal matching Medicaid dollars to help set up pilot sites that would give coverage to the uninsured. Participating medical providers would then manage these patients’ care and potentially improve their health. full story

Milestone: 50 years of Medicare and Medicaid

When signing the bill creating Medicare and Medicaid 50 years ago, President Lyndon B. Johnson held the ceremony in Independence, Missouri, where former President Harry Truman lived.

Truman, who had pushed unsuccessfully for national health insurance during his own presidency, was at LBJ’s side during the signing. (And in one of those of odd coincidences of U.S. political history, the two presidents from different eras would die less than a month apart in the early 1970s.)

 

President Lyndon Johnson signs the Medicare bill into law while former President Harry Truman (seated) looks on.

President Lyndon Johnson signs the Medicare bill into law while Harry Truman (seated) looks on.

The decades-long push to create the two health insurance programs was like “a long-distance run,’’ said Dr. David Satcher, a former U.S. surgeon general, at a Carter Center forum Wednesday.

Satcher added that it was also “like a relay race,’’ noting that Truman handed off the “baton’’ of national insurance to LBJ.

This week, federal officials along with many health care and community organizations are marking the 50th anniversary of Medicare and Medicaid, created July 30, 1965.   full story

Poll finds big gaps in rural health care

Most rural Georgia residents in a new survey say they have experienced problems with the affordability of health insurance and the cost of health care.

Healthcare CostWhen asked the biggest problem facing local health care, 68 percent named cost, with quality of care and access to care trailing far behind, according to the survey of 491 people. It was conducted by Opinion Savvy and commissioned by Healthcare Georgia Foundation.

The poll may be the first to focus entirely on rural health care issues in Georgia. It comes in the wake of four rural hospital closings in the state since the beginning of 2013.

Those hospitals closed due to financial problems, and the economic and medical effects of their loss have drawn the attention of Georgia’s political leadership.

Across America, rural residents generally lag far behind people in other areas when it comes to health and quality of medical care.  full story

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