Clean linens are safe linens, and hospitals don’t take them for granted Hot

Feature Jul 15, 2018 0

While thinking about the rough flu season that Georgia had this year, I wondered about something: How do hospitals keep everything running smoothly when they are overwhelmed with patients who are contagious? What about things that have to be... Read more

Report provides no answers in Waycross child cancer cases

Feature Jul 5, 2018 1

Andy Miller is editor and CEO of Georgia Health News. Brenda Goodman is senior... Read more

Three sisters do their part for Georgia’s longevity tradition

Feature Jun 25, 2018 0

Springfield Baptist Church in Sparta recently played host to a celebration for three local... Read more
Despite low testing, report indicates lead in many U.S. schools’ water
Fewer than half of U.S. school districts test their drinking water for lead, according...
A superb Georgia reporter, and a great guy, is gone
Tom Crawford, the dean of state Capitol journalists, who reported on Georgia politics for...
Physicians groups sue over Blue Cross denial of some ER claims
Two physicians organizations filed a lawsuit Tuesday against Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Georgia and...
New law on ‘virtual credit cards’ preserves pay options for providers
The term “virtual credit cards’’ sounds like some futuristic version of the typical plastic....
Federal funding for ACA ‘navigators’ to drop dramatically in Georgia
The White House is again slashing funds for the “navigators’’ who help enroll people...
Despite low testing, report indicates lead in many U.S. schools’ water

Fewer than half of U.S. school districts test their drinking water for lead, according to a federal report released this week.

But among those districts that do test, more than one-third found elevated lead levels in their water.

 

The report by the Government Accountability Office (GAO) follows a renewed public health focus on lead since the 2015 environmental disaster in Flint, Mich., where a switch in water processing caused a spike in the percentage of children testing high for lead poisoning.

Lead poses serious health dangers for children, including impairment of memory and thinking skills, as well as behavioral problems. There is no safe lead ...

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A superb Georgia reporter, and a great guy, is gone

Tom Crawford, the dean of state Capitol journalists, who reported on Georgia politics for more than three decades, has passed away after a long battle with cancer. He was 67.

He was a great inspiration to me. Tom’s Georgia Report model differed from ours at Georgia Health News, yet we shared a passion for our work as basically solo journalism acts.

Tom was generous with his time when helping a reporter who didn’t venture into the political jungle all that often.

Even when he was obviously ill, he explained to me in a patient, kindly manner just how the legislative machinery worked.

Not all ...

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Physicians groups sue over Blue Cross denial of some ER claims

Two physicians organizations filed a lawsuit Tuesday against Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Georgia and its parent company over the insurer’s emergency room payment policy, calling it “dangerous.’’

The parent company, Indianapolis-based Anthem, has pursued a new policy over the past year in Georgia and five other states, reviewing customers’ ER visits and limiting or denying payment for those it deems not to have been true emergencies.

The new lawsuit, from the Medical Association of Georgia (MAG) and the American College of Emergency Physicians, seeks to force Blue Cross to end its emergency care payment policy.

A similar lawsuit was filed by Piedmont Healthcare hospitals ...

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New law on ‘virtual credit cards’ preserves pay options for providers

The term “virtual credit cards’’ sounds like some futuristic version of the typical plastic.

But to many doctors, dentists, hospitals and other medical providers, it’s very much a part of their present day. And not always desirable.

The Georgia General Assembly, in fact, took action on the virtual credit cards this year.

Here’s how the virtual cards work: A medical provider bills an insurer for a $100 service. The insurer can pay through an electronic funds transfer or a physical check, but instead delivers a virtual credit card to the provider.

There’s no actual plastic involved. The ‘‘card’’ is just a single-use series of numbers ...

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Corporate greed gives Americans a raw deal on drug prices
Big Pharma has argued for decades that documented higher drug prices in the United States are required to support...
As a pediatrician, I see guns as a threat to our children
Recently I attended an American Academy of Pediatrics gathering of pediatricians representing state chapters from around the country. One...
Georgia Legislature must act now on surprise bills, and here’s how
What good is paying for health insurance if it doesn’t cover you when you need it most? Georgia insurance...
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