In Warner Robins, Muslim doctors play a key role 

This is the fourth in a series of articles on foreign-born physicians practicing in Georgia. Other articles in this special report have focused on barriers that immigrant doctors face if they want to work in the state; a clinic that serves mainly immigrant and refugee patients; and on Indian physicians here. If you get admitted to the Houston Medical Center in the central Georgia town of Warner Robins, there is a good chance that a physician from the Middle East or South Asia will treat you.  And there’s a good chance, too, that the physician is a Muslim. A few years ago, it was a guarantee for certain patients, says Dr. Mohammad Al-Shroof. “It just happened that all interventional cardiologists — heart specialists who put in stents and do bypass surgery — on staff were Muslims,” recalls the Warner Robins internist, who is also the chief of staff at Houston Medical Center. And most of them were foreign born. “So, if you had a heart attack and were taken to our hospital, the doctor saving your life was a Muslim, regardless.” There are about 220 physicians in Houston County, which is solid GOP territory. Al-Shroof estimates that more than a quarter of them have an immigrant background. Al-Shroof, 49, was born in Jordan with Palestinian roots. He came to the United States 27 years ago, did his residency training at Nassau University Medical Center in Long Island, N.Y., and then moved to Middle Georgia, because that’s where they needed doctors,…